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Five Boroughs Food Talk: Markets
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This project is funded by the Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation, through the generous support of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation.




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+ About the Performance
This program was recorded 05/26/2015 at Symphony Space.

The southwest corner building on 95th and Broadway, now known as Symphony Space, started its life in 1915 as Astor Market, a grandiose classical emporium of meat, fish, and produce built by Vincent Astor. It's only fitting, as we approach 100 years, that we celebrate the revival of the marketplace in New York City with host Gabriella Gershenson and guests including Gabrielle Langholtz, editor in chief of Edible Manhattan and author of The New Greenmarket Cookbook, Meredith Tenhoor, Associate Professor at Pratt Institute's School of Architecture, Eli Zabar of Eli's Manhattan and many markets and restaurants of the Upper East Side, and Jessamyn Rodriguez of Hot Bread Kitchen.

Gabriella Gershenson is the food features editor at Everyday With Rachel Ray magazine. She was formerly senior editor at Saveur, and prior to that, edited the dining section at Time Out New York magazine. Her articles have appeared in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, San Francisco Chronicle, The Boston Globe and many other publications. She's been a regular guest on WOR's Food Talk with Mike Colameco and NYC TV's Eat Out New York with Kelly Choi, and appeared on the Food Network shows 24 Hour Restaurant Battle and The Best Thing I Ever Ate.

+ About the Artists

GABRIELLA GERSHENSON is the food features editor at Every Day with Rachel Ray magazine. She was formerly senior editor at Saveur, and prior to that, edited the dining section at Time Out New York magazine. Her articles have appeared in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, San Francisco Chronicle, The Boston Globe and many other publications. She has been a regular guest on WOR’s Food Talk with Mike Colameco and NYC TV’s Eat Out New York with Kelly Choi, and appeared on the Food Network’s 24 Hour Restaurant Battle and The Best Thing I Ever Ate. She lives in New York City.

GABRIELLE LANGHOLTZ is the editor of Edible Brooklyn and Edible Manhattan and the author of The New Greenmarket Cookbook, which NPR named one of the best books of 2014. Her background includes many projects at the intersection of gastronomy and ecology: She ran communications for the Greenmarket for eight years, wrote the teacher’s guide to Michael Pollan’s Botany of Desire, grew vegetables in the Catksills, volunteered at The Edible Schoolyard in Berkeley, taught a master’s course in NYU’s Food Studies program and produced a “Farm School” series for WNYC. She has visited dozens of local farms, milked cows and sheep, castrated piglets, tapped sugar maples, foraged ramps, got in the way of swarming bees, helped slaughter turkeys, and has planted and picked more varieties of fruits and vegetables than most Americans eat in a lifetime. She prefers carrots to sticks.

JESSAMYN RODRIGUEZ has used her dual passions for baking and social justice to lead the growth of Hot Bread Kitchen from a visionary idea to a thriving bakery and social enterprise. Since its founding, Hot Bread Kitchen has trained dozens of women from 19 countries including Mali, Afghanistan, Ethiopia, Mexico and Morocco, giving them the culinary and entrepreneurial skills needed to work in the food industry or start their own businesses. Jessamyn received the Eileen Fisher Company’s Grant for Women Social Entrepreneurs in 2007 and was named an Echoing Green Fellow in 2008. In 2010, she was selected as an inaugural entrepreneur for The Hitachi Foundation’s Yoshiyama Young Entrepreneurs grant and was also awarded the first annual Coro New York Alumni Award for Civic Leadership. The Clinton Global Initiative awarded Jessamyn the Global Citizen Award for her vision and scalable solution to global issues in 2013. And, in 2014, Jessamyn was awarded New York Women’s Foundation Celebrating Women Award alongside Gloria Steinem and Soffiyah Elijah.

Before founding Hot Bread Kitchen, Jessamyn spent a decade working for NGOs, the government, and the United Nations. With a focus on human rights, education, and immigration issues, Jessamyn’s work has taken her to Mexico, Costa Rica, Bosnia, and Guatemala. Jessamyn holds an MPA from Columbia University, a BA from the University of British Columbia and a Master Baker certificate from the New School University.

MEREDITH TENHOOR is Associate Professor and coordinates the architectural history and theory curriculum at Pratt Institute’s School of Architecture. Her research examines how architecture, urbanism, and landscape design participate in the consumption and distribution ofresources, and in recent years has been focused on architecture’s engagements with food and race. She has contributed essays about food landscapes and market design to the edited volumes Food in the City (Harvard University Press, 2015), Governing by Design (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2012), and Above the Pavement the Farm: Architecture and Agriculture at Public Farm 1 (Princeton Architectural Press, 2010) and is at work on a book about the development of France’s food distribution systems from 1930-72, as well as a book about architectural conceptsof privacy.

Meredith is also the editor and former chair of Aggregate, a nonprofit research cooperative and publication devoted to advancing architectural scholarship. She recently commissioned and edited (with Jonathan Massey) Black Lives Matter, a dossier of essays on race and architecture published on the Aggregate website. Her book, Street Value: Shopping, Planning and Politics at Fulton Mall (with Rosten Woo) examines the history of race, consumption, planning, and design in a gentrifying city, and was named a top ten book from Planetizen and a recommended book by design Observer.

Born and raised on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, ELI ZABAR was destined for the world of food and wine. After graduating from Columbia University in 1967, he ran an ice cream shop in Nantucket for a summer and spent a short time at various food and wine businesses in New York before opening E.A.T. at 1064 Madison Avenue in 1973. Since then, Eli Zabar’s name has become synonymous with the high-quality food he sources both locally and all over the globe for his gourmet markets. His breads, crisps and pastries are renowned, and above his bakery on York Avenue, he built one of NYC’s first rooftop greenhouses, where he grows lettuces, herbs and produce for his markets and restaurants. Eli’s businesses dot the Upper East Side, including two gourmet markets, Eli’s Manhattan and Eli’s Vinegar Factory; fine dining restaurant Eli’s Table; his original shop, E.A.T. and the whimsical E.A.T. Gift shop, as well as a market stand at Grand Central Terminal. His newest concept, Eli’s Essentials, is part Grab & Go café, part market, offering everything that Eli loves under one roof – great coffee, his housemade breads, a fresh salad bar, endless breakfast and lunch options, and freshly prepared takeaway items. He has recently opened three locations, including Eli’s Essentials Wine Bar, which also serves small plates and a curated wine list in the evenings.

Along with great food, Eli has also developed a love affair with wine, and along with his restaurant and new wine bar, he has a wine shop and website called Eli’s List, where he shares wines from his cellar of traditionally-made, Old World wines.

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